With scissors, stone and paper

With scissors, stone, paper to become a millionaire ?!
When talking about scissors, stone and paper, everyone thinks of a breeze about who gets drinks out of the cellar or gets caught up in a soccer team game to a team captain. In English-speaking countries, however, scissors, stone, paper is a veritable popular sport in which even championships with high prize money are held. World Cups were held annually between 2002 and 2009 before the death of World Rock Paper Scissors Society president Wojek Smallsoa prevented further contests. There are still world-wide tournaments, whereby the happening has increasingly shifted to the Internet. However, the Red Bull Roshambull World Online Series fell victim to the sponsor’s withdrawal after five rounds this year. The historical origins of scissors, stone, Paper dates back to the Chinese Ming Dynasty. The game enjoyed great popularity in Japan in the 18th century before it began its worldwide triumphal march. Scissors, stone, paper or Roshambo (named after a soldier of the American Civil War) also have a long tradition in the United States, and supporters of this strangely disciplined discipline would never call Roshambo a game of chance. Purely mathematically, the event ends with a sufficient number of games, although in the stalemate, since the probabilities of the three moves scissors, stone, paper cancel, but professionals see quite a game-theoretical advantages on their side. The American professional Rafe Furst, for example, who claims to have earned millions with Roshambo, opens every duel with the sentence “I take the stone” and puts a lot of pressure on his opponent. How will this react and what conclusions can be drawn from it? For example, if the opponent counters with paper, Furst will judge him as good-faith and build his further game on it. On the other hand, an opponent who takes a pair of scissors is suspicious and has to be treated differently, while someone taking a stone first takes a wait-and-see approach and is the hardest nut to crack. In lengthy matches, Furst believes he can see through and beat every opponent. According to Furst, it is about thinking one step ahead of the opponent, and if this succeeds, he will simply be unbeatable. Especially for poker players, Furst recommends scissors, stone, paper as a training program. In this way you learn to put yourself in the opponent, to make his game varied and to think as many …